A Better Kind of Energy Drink

A Better Kind of Energy Drink

Energy drinks have become a staple at workplaces, campuses and homes nationwide. With different flavors, bright colors and grab-and-go portability, they’ve become an easy, legal way to keep the energy going…but that’s not always a good thing.

Between gulping energy drinks, sodas and coffee, it’s easy to see how anyone could quickly become overly-caffeinated. While straight-up brewed tea and coffee does have varying amounts of caffeine, what they (and even soda) don’t have – that many energy drinks do – is questionable ingredients. According to a Huffington Post article, because energy drinks “often contain plant and herbal extracts in addition to caffeine, they can choose to label themselves as dietary supplements rather than food, and aren’t regulated or evaluated for safety by the FDA.”

energy drinksIn addition to unregulated ingredients, energy drinks can also be incredibly dehydrating. “…[E]nergy drinks are [not] appropriate to consume while exercising,” the article noted. “The diuretic effect of caffeinated energy drinks can cause the body to lose water, dehydrating you in the process.”

Many energy drinks also are loaded with sugar (and calories), which accounts for part of the buzz and rush of energy many people experience. But as with anything featuring a high sugar content, that “sugar crash” is also bound to occur. Sugar crashes can actually have the opposite effect that students are wanting, making them irritable, hungry and fatigued.

Mixing alcohol with energy drinks has also gained popularity with young adults in the past decade. It’s become such a problem that Brown University dedicated a webpage that addresses the issue. According to Brown, the problem with mixing alcohol and energy drinks is that one is a stimulant (energy drink) and one is a depressant (alcohol); the combination of effects may be dangerous. “The stimulant effects can mask how intoxicated you are and prevent you from realizing how much alcohol you have consumed. Research has [also] found that people drink more and have higher blood alcohol contents when they combine alcohol and caffeine. In addition, both energy drinks and alcohol are very dehydrating (the caffeine in energy drinks is a diuretic). Dehydration can hinder your body’s ability to metabolize alcohol and will increase the toxicity, and therefore the hangover, the next day.”

It’s important to understand that in moderation, energy drinks can be fine. And not all “energy drinks” are created equal, which is why at Vollara, we created Re:Vive, a unique, natural supplement that significantly boosts energy, elevates mental focus and supports your health without the unwanted side effects found with most stimulants and drugs.

 

Re:Vive

 

A convenient, on-the-go supplement, Re:Vive comes in individually-packaged powdered form that you mix with water, creating a delicious and exhilarating boost for your day. It comes in a refreshing wild berry flavor, and contains vitamins, minerals, enzymes and natural extracts to enhance mental focus, support the immune system and maintain overall well-being. It also doesn’t contain any sugar, so you won’t need to worry about “crashing” later on.

 

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Consult with your health practitioner and/or pharmacist if you are using any medications.

 

 

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